Wednesday, June 24, 2009

CHERI'S FAVORITE PIZZA DOUGH, ADAPTED


Blogging buddy Cheri, of Fabulous Foods, worked on her friend Mitch's pizza dough recipe for over a year in a friendly competition, trying to best him. She came up with a really great pizza dough recipe by subbing semolina for part of the flour. Semolina is a de-germed and de-branned flour, just like regular all-purpose, but it's made from a high-protein flour. It's yellow color comes from the type of wheat. Because of the way semolina is processed, its texture is coarser than all-purpose flour, and it's the magic ingredient in this dough. Italians have known about semolina for a long time. (My mother-in-law always used to tell me to buy pasta made with semolina.) It adds the chewy texture to this pizza dough, which a true pizza connoisseur reveres.
I did have some trouble with the recipe -- no way could I use the amount of water in the recipe. First off, when I placed the water, yeast and honey in my food processor and pulsed, I had a huge mess -- the mixture splashed up so much it actually came out of the processor. And I've not had success baking pizzas at 550F -- they burn at that temp. My own method is to set the oven at 550F, then immediately reduce to 400F when the pizza goes in.
I've already rated Mitch's pizza dough recipe 10/10, but I need to rethink that rating. Now that I've made both recipes, I can say that I like Mitch's because I can roll it very thin; but I like Cheri's because it has the flavor and chew that comes from semolina. But neither one has it all, so I'm rating both a 9 and am still searching for that elusive "perfect" pizza dough -- one that is crispy on the edges and tender and chewy inside, and has a good flavor. 9 is a very high rating -- I would make either of these pizza doughs again, because they're both excellent.
Cheri's Favorite Pizza Dough, Adapted
Source: Fabulous Foods
Rating: 9 out of 10
INGREDIENTS: 1 cup very warm water, divided use
2 tsp. active dry yeast (not Rapid Rise or instant)
2 tsp. sugar (I used honey)
2-1/2 cups bread flour
1/2 cup semolina flour (Bob's Red Mill semolina is available in some grocery stores and online)
1 tsp. sea salt
Combine 1/4 cup water, yeast and sugar or honey in work bowl of food processor and pulse to mix. Let sit for about 5 minutes, or till yeast starts to foam.
Measure flours and salt in a large bowl; whisk together. Add 1 cup flour to yeast mixture and pulse to mix. Gradually add remaining water and flour mixture, pulsing while adding. When all ingredients have been added, adjust dough as needed, adding more water to make dough looser, or more flour to tighten it up. You want to use the least amount of flour to get a pliable dough. Too much flour will make the dough tighter and tougher.
Unlike cake batter, yeast dough likes to be beat to death, so have at it! Pulse it, pulse it, pulse it, then pulse it some more. When you've beaten it to death, take the dough out and place it in a bowl that has 1 Tbsp. olive oil smeared around the inside. It helps if your hands still have the olive oil on them -- it will keep the dough from sticking to your fingers. Turn the dough over once, to coat the top with oil as well. Cover with a damp, clean kitchen towel and let rise in a warm, draft-free place until doubled in size, about an hour or so. I like to use my microwave oven (turned off, of course). Test for doubling by putting two fingers into the dough; if the dents remain, the dough has doubled. Also look for little "blisters" on the surface of the dough. You can prepare the dough for baking now, but it will even be better if it "cures" in the fridge overnight. Curing gives the dough more flavor. If desired, you can freeze the dough after the first rising. Let it come to room temperature before shaping and baking. Yield: two (11") pizzas
If you don't have a pizza stone, please do buy one. They're only about $10 and they do make your crust better. I usually cut a piece of parchment about the size of the stone and sprinkle some cornmeal onto it before placing my dough on top. This makes it ever so easy to slip the pizza on and off the stone.









16 comments:

♥peachkins♥ said...

This pizza is mouthwatering.Can I have a slice?

Mary said...

Wow this is nice and tasty!

Barbara Bakes said...

My kids have been wanting to make homemade pizza lately. Yours looks delicious!

Lynda said...

The pizza certainly looks delicious, Judy!

Debbie said...

Your pizza looks wonderful Judy. I have never made my own pizza dough. One of these days I have to give it a try!

Yasmeen said...

Yummy pizza!Adding semolina must make this nice and chewy.I wish to buy the pizza stone,but I never spotted one in stores here.

Judy said...

Yasmeen - Unglazed quarry tiles will also work if you can't find a pizza stone.

Mar said...

A delicious pizza, in my home eat pizza a lot....
A kiss

unconfidentialcook said...

My daughter makes pizzas with dough from Trader Joe's, but I never make it from scratch. Don't have a stone, not sure my oven gets hot enough...and I suppose there are several other excuses that just don't add up.

My Carolina Kitchen said...

Semolina makes all the difference in the world. You've made a great pizza Judy.
Sam

Reeni♥ said...

The pizza looks delicious, home-made is the best. I'm still searching for the perfect pizza dough, too!

teresa said...

I am a pizza fanatic, so I have no doubt that I'll be trying this soon!

Juliana said...

Love homemade pizza...taste much better. Never bought semolina...should try...thanks. The pictures look so yummie.

Katrina said...

I'll have to get some semolina. The pizza looks delish!

Talita said...

This pizza looks awesome! I can't believe is homemade dough!

Anonymous said...

Thanks for such a great post and the review, I am totally impressed!